Molteno Paleoflora

Gaining insight through fossils

A fossil is the remains or impression of a prehistoric plant or animal embedded and preserved in rock. By studying the plant fossils (paleoflora) and animals fossils found in rock formations laid down over the ages, scientists gain great insight into the past and what happened to bring us to this point in time.

Wetland restored by Kommetjie Coastal Stewards

What has the focus of Dr John Anderson’s work been?

The on-going research at the centre of all John Anderson’s work as a paleobotanist and author / editor of publications such as “Towards Gondwana Alive”, “Africa Alive Corridors”, “Earth Alive Strategies” and the “Biodiversity & Extinction”, has been on the fossil flora found in the Molteno Formation.

Wetland restored by Kommetjie Coastal Stewards

How has John brought his work to the public?

The fossil flora found in the Molteno rock formation was deposited around the time of origin of the dinosaurs and mammals—in the Karoo Basin of South Africa.

 

The reconstruction of the vegetation of the Molteno formation at Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens show that at this time the Karoo looked very different to the way it does today.

 

According to Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molteno_Formation) there was an unusually large biodiversity at class and order level, especially in insects and gymnosperms (which reached their heyday during this period). Other especially common flora, were species of fern, horsetail and cycad.

Much of the region, at the time, fell within an enormous network of inland river deltas. To date, seven primary habitat types (or ecozones) have been identified, each with their own large assemblage of species:

  • Dicroidium riparian forest (types 1 & 2)
  • Dicroidium woodland
  • Sphernobaiera woodland
  • Heidiphyllum thicket
  • Equisetum marsh
  • Fern & Gingkophytopsis meadow

 

The forest, woodland, marsh and meadow ecozones are very different to the dry, semi-desert succulent Karoo we know today. The clues as to what happened in the Karoo over time are found in the Molteno fossil collection. John Anderson and Heidi Anderson (Holmes) collected fossils from 100 ‘localities’ (mostly new) around the extensive outcrop. Their monograph series, unique in the field, has shown this flora to represent what might well prove to reflect the moment of greatest plant diversity through geological time. Sir Peter Crane, Director of the Kew Gardens at the time, wrote in 2003, for instance, ‘I am not aware of any set of fossil assemblages that has been collected with such intensity, such uniformity of approach and such care

“Molteno Sphenophytes:  This is one of a series of volumes on our collection of fossil plants from the Molteno Formation of the Karoo Basin, SA (Late Triassic, 230 million years ago). The Molteno represents globally the heyday, in biodiversity, of the gymnosperms (cone-bearing plants).”

Dr John Anderson

Why Gondwana Alive supports the work of Dr John Anderson’s Molteno publications?

We support AAC because it goes back billions of years and demonstrates through scientific evidence the inter-relatedness between geological, natural and cultural heritage. This epic story is a powerful reminder that we don’t live in a world of isolated silos that is easy to control, we live in an inter-connected world, and the only thing we can control is what we do in each moment and how we do it. Because all things are inter-related we need to make conscious, respectful decisions in each moment if we are to stem the “Sixth Extinction” and heal our home.

How does Gondwana Alive support this very important work?

Through promotion and application of research that helps promote biodiversity & stem extinction, by building capacity for monitoring and research, and contributing through practice to the growing body of socio-ecological knowledge.

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Stemming Extinction requires knowledge in action!

Authored by some of the world’s leading scientists and thinkers on the subject, our publications are designed to inform and challenge. Read on below.

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“All of [Dr john] Anderson’s projects –from palaeobotany to Earth Alive to cultural history–are intimately linked. They are interdisciplinary and multinational. Indeed, they showcase the fundamental connection between all things. Consilience operated in the past and a deep sense of consilience—of reconciliation—is being stressed by Anderson and colleagues as our only option as a species into the future.”

A pending citation towards consideration of Dr John Anderson for an Associate Professorship at Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University,

Africa Alive

AAC

Africa Alive Corridors

Introduction

A custodian is a caretaker, keeper, guardian,…

The Earth’s natural, cultural and geological heritage is captured at prime sites around the globe. There is a need to celebrate these prime heritage sites and encourage their custodianship.

Why do we need to take care of our heritage?

Celebrating and understanding the past can help us build a better future – for example we won’t make the same mistake twice.

Africa Alive Corridors – What are they?

Dr John Anderson and Prof Maarten de Wit introduced the concept of connecting selected prime heritage sites into Corridors, with each Corridor telling a successive chapter in the Earth’s story. This concept has been widely endorsed by the scientific community at Gondwana Symposia.

The Africa Alive Corridor Project – How is the story told?

John Anderson and Maarten de Wit are developing the AFRICA ALIVE Corridor project under the auspices of AEON – the Africa Earth Observatory Network (http://aeon.org.za/activities/africa-alive-corridors/).

The Africa Alive Corridor publications, tell the story of Africa’s autobiography along 20 prime heritage Corridors. The AAC project was launched in May 2008, in Arusha, Tanzania, at the African launch of UNESCO’s ‘International Year of Planet Earth’ and was selected as one of two Africa legacy projects. The first two publications include contributions from over 100 scientists and are soon to be published.

“The story is holistic viewing the continent from the geological, natural and cultural perspectives….in the context of this volume, the corridors play a definitive part allowing us to demonstrate clearly the reality of the interdepedence between all the pieces of the puzzle.”

Why GA supports AAC

GA supports AAC because it goes back billions of years and demonstrates through scientific evidence the inter-relatedness between geological, natural and cultural heritage. This epic story is a powerful reminder that we don’t live in a world of isolated silos that is easy to control, we live in an inter-connected world, and the only thing we can control is what we do in each moment and how we do it. Because all things are inter-related we need to make conscious, respectful decisions in each moment if we are to stem the “Sixth Extinction” and heal our home.

How does GA support AAC?

GA supports AAC by contributing to their publications.

Download our contributions on invasive mussels and first person short-stories here.

Stewardship means the management or care of something…

We also support stewardship projects in biodiversity hotspots along these prime heritage Corridors. For example, the RIM of Africa trail runs along mountain chain that follows the length of the Homo sapien Corridor, and promotes celebration and conservation of a unique, mountain fynbos wilderness. And, the !Khwa ttu San Culture & Education Centre on the Homo sapien Corridor “celebrates the past and present to build a better future” (www.khwattu.org).

Do you have a similar publication that ticks these boxes? We would love to support your cause. Contact us here or see some of our other Publications here.

Homo sapiens Corridor

Why focus on the Homo sapiens Corridor?

To shift human consciousness and heal our planet we need to increase awareness and understanding of our place in the deep history of the world.

<em>Homo sapien</em> Corridor

What do we find when we look deeper?

If we trace humanity’s story back over the past 200 000 years, we find that our human journey is inseparably linked to the geological, climatic and biological journey of our constantly changing world. This story is told more compellingly on Africa’s southern Cape coast than anywhere else in the world.

We are endangering the future of all life on Earth. The Gondwana Alive project calls us to action before it is utterly too late” (Jane Goodall).

The How of of our Cultural Evolution

The AAC – Homo sapien publication traces the 200 000 year old story of humankind’s emergence at a collection of 20 prime heritage sites along a 1000km Corridor following the southern Cape coast.
This story tells how our cultural evolution is interwoven with the geological evolution of the 500 000 million year old Cape Fold Mountains and Table Mountain, climate changes over the ages and the biological evolution of some 9000 terrestrial species (70% endemic) and 10000 (15% of world total) This epic story demonstrates quite clearly that “We are dependent on the prodigious richness of plant and animal life about us, and that life is now dependent on us.”
marine species.

Given this interdependence it is ironic that the Cape is listed by … as a biodiversity hotspot with many unique species having been wiped out or endangered by human activities – hunting, destruction of natural habitat, introduction of alien invasive species, fishing.
“Our human journey is inseparably linked to changing climate, a shifting coastline, the topographic barrier formed by the Cape Mountain range, and the great diversity of plant and animal life—terrestrial and coastal marine—that has evolved in this environment.”

The Gondwana Alive project takes up this challenge with a three-approach: spreading awareness, canvassing a critical mass of opinion globally, and sustaining action through the coming decades.

The Gondwana Alive project is about “… the children’s of today’s world and the children of tomorrow’s world” (Nelson Mandela).
“It is my hope this book will reach out to all people of the world and serve as a catalyst for action to steer us away from the dangerous course of business-as-usual (Kofi Annan).

Why GA supports AAC

GA supports AAC because it goes back billions of years and demonstrates through scientific evidence the inter-relatedness between geological, natural and cultural heritage. This epic story is a powerful reminder that we don’t live in a world of isolated silos that is easy to control, we live in an inter-connected world, and the only thing we can control is what we do in each moment and how we do it. Because all things are inter-related we need to make conscious, respectful decisions in each moment if we are to stem the “Sixth Extinction” and heal our home.

“This is the kind of projection of science to the public we need worldwide to save biodiversity… (Edward O. Wilson)”

How does GA support AAC?

GA supports AAC by contributing to their publications. Download our contributions on invasive species and first person short-stories here.
Stewardship means the management or care of something. We also support stewardship custodianship projects in biodiversity hotspots along these prime heritage Corridors. For example:

  • the RIM of Africa trail runs along mountain chain that follows the length of the Homo sapien Corridor, and promotes celebration and conservation of a unique, mountain fynbos wilderness.
  • And, the !Khwa ttu San Culture & Education Centre on the Homo sapien Corridor “celebrates the past and present to build a better future” (www.khwattu.org).

Do you have a similar publication that ticks these boxes? We would love to support your cause. Contact us here or see some of our other Publications here.

Click here to download the PDF Homo Sapiens Short Story

Now expanding to Corridors of Life between Earth and Mars (click here to download the pdf)

African Renaissance (UNISA)

banner_IARSb

Why the need for this focus?

The African Renaissance is the concept that African people and nations shall overcome the current challenges confronting the continent and achieve cultural, scientific, and economic renewal.

What does African Renaissance have to do with Africa Alive Corridors?

The African Renaissance is well aligned with the Africa Alive Corridors project which tells the story of Africa along 20 heritage Corridors spanning the continent. Co-Author and Editor of the Africa Alive Corridor publications, Dr John Anderson, is exploring a partnership with the Institute for African Renaissance to develop a project that will promote the African Renaissance.

The Institute for African Renaissance Studies was established at the University of South Africa (UNISA) in June 2003. “The research and teaching objectives of the Institute, focused as they are on African Renaissance, are well aligned with the desire for people to help themselves through the practical application of knowledge and resources to improve their quality of life and that of future generations.”

How is the above being implemented?

As a first step in their involving “synnovation” (as John Anderson puts it) – an event is planned for May 2016 at the at the Institute’s Little Theatre.

“When once more the saying is recalled, Ex Africa semper aliquid novi! (Something new always comes out of Africa!), this must be so, because out of Africa reborn must come modern products of human economic activity, significant contributions to the world of knowledge, in the arts, science and technology, new images of an Africa of peace and prosperity.” Thabo Mbeki speaking at the United Nations University 9 April 1998

See the banner on this Publications page and follow the link for more details.

Why Gondwana Alive supports the African Renaissance

Africa is the cradle of humankind and if we dig back into Africa’s past, there is much humanity can learn from to help build a World which celebrates diversity and makes sustainable use of our natural and cultural heritage to bring about environmental, social and economic renewal in Africa and beyond.

How does GA support the African Renaissance?

Follow us to keep tabs on the Africa Alive Corridor / Institute for African Renaissance event at the Little Theatre planned for May 2016.

Do you have a similar event that ticks these boxes? We would love to support your cause. Contact us here or see some of our other events here.

Cradle Peak AfriPark

Cradle park

The need for a tangible experience of Africa Alive Corridors

While Dr John Anderson’s publications reach a wide audience and engage scientists, school children and even politicians in communicating about and tackling Earth’s problems, a tangible experience is often more effective means of communicating with and engaging the public. There is a need to create such an experience of the Africa Alive Corridors.

What would be the best place for such an experience?

What better place to create this experience than the ‘Cradle of Humankind’.

According to www.wikipedia.com “the Cradle of Humankind was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1999. It is about 50 kilometres northwest of JohannesburgSouth Africa in the Gauteng province. This site currently occupies 47,000 hectares (180 sq mi) and it contains a complex of limestone caves. Many of the early hominid fossils have been found in these caves – hence the term “Cradle of Humankind”.

Information on the official visitor centre can be found on www.maropeng.co.za. At Maropeng visitors can see an exhibition on how our ancestors developed over the past 15 million years.

How has this come about?

On a farm adjacent Maropeng, a group of private investors with John Anderson as educational consultant, are dedicated to building an edutainment theme park. This ‘AfriPark’ will include a football-field sized 3D map of Africa showing the 20 AAC heritage corridors and telling their story. Interactive, virtual reality will play a big role in helping the public learn about and experience our human journey.

“Maropeng means “returning to the place of origin” in Setswana, the main indigenous language in this area of South Africa. The Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site is an easy drive of about an hour from Johannesburg or Pretoria. Our ancestors have lived in this area for more than 3-million years. By coming here, you are coming to the birthplace of humanity. Welcome home!”

FIND OUT MORE on www.maropeng.co.za

Why Gondwana Alive supports the work of AfriPark

Besides a wonderful interactive experience of Africa’s heritage, the AfriPark is located in the grassland / savannah ecosystem that is home to Earth’s last remaining large mammals.

According to www.wikipedia.com “a savannah is a grassland ecosystem characterised by the trees being sufficiently widely spaced so that the canopy does not close. The open canopy allows sufficient light to reach the ground to support an unbroken herbaceous layer consisting primarily of grasses… Savannahs are also characterised by seasonal water availability, with the majority of rainfall confined to one season; they are associated with several types of biomes, and are frequently in a transitional zone between forest and desert or grassland. Savannah covers approximately 20% of the Earth’s land area.”

When humans moved out of Africa they left waves of extinction in their wake. Over 80% of all large mammals (e.g. mammoth, pygmy hippo, marsupial lion) were hunted to extinction in the first wave; except in Africa (see Biodiversity & Extinction series, Part 4).

Large mammals play a critical role in crafting the landscape we see around us and need to be protected.

According to the ‘International Union for Conservation of Nature’ (www.iucn.org) …

“Mammals play key roles within the ecosystems in which they live, and are critical in maintaining the functions and services provided by ecosystems. They achieve this through their roles as grazers, predators, pollinators and seed dispersers. Mammals also provide numerous benefits to humans, both directly and indirectly; they are an important food source for many cultures, and are used in recreation and improving livelihoods around the world. Indirectly, mammals are very important in maintaining balanced ecosystems and the services they provide to mankind. The consequences of species extinction extend well beyond the last animal of its kind. We are just beginning to understand the cascading effects that extinction can have on other species, ecosystems and on our own survival.”

The planned AfriPark is located in the recently declared Magaliesberg Biosphere Reserve and will help to raise awareness of the need to protect the grassland / savannah ecosystem that is so important to the survival of Earth’s last remaining large mammals, so important to our own survival.

FOLLOW this link to find out more about the UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) World Network of Biosphere Reserves are meant to demonstrate a balanced relationship between people and nature (i.e. encourage sustainable development).

http://www.unesco.org/new/en/natural-sciences/environment/ecological-sciences/biosphere-reserves/world-network-wnbr/

How does GA support the AfriPark?

The project is in the early stages of development. GA will assist where possible with project development, educational guidance and promotion.

Follow us to keep tabs on development of the planned AfriPark near Maropeng in the ‘Cradle of Humankind’.

Do you have a similar project that ticks these boxes? We would love to support your cause. Contact us here or see some of the other projects we support.

Gondwana Alive

GA edited

Towards Gondwana Alive

Why the need to focus on Gondwana Alive

To ensure our survival and heal the only planet humanity can call home, we need to spread awareness of the need to take care of plants and animals and stem the “Sixth Extinction”.

The Sixth Extinction

Extinction of a particular animal or plant species occurs when there are no more individuals of that species alive anywhere in the world – the species has died out.

“The Earth has seen five mass extinctions of different species. Natural disasters caused these extinctions. The Sixth Extinction began about 70 000 years ago, when our ancestors began to spread across the world from Africa. People destroyed habitat, introduced alien species to areas, and began to pollute. It’s not much different to what we are doing to the environment today. Biologists predict that, if we don’t stop this wave of extinction, half of all plants, animals and birds will become extinct before 2100.
We have had a significant impact on the variety of species on Earth. Our impact has sometimes led to their extinction. We need to do something about this.” (Biodiversity & Extinction, Prof. J Anderson, Supernova Magazine 2015)

Why is it important to the “Stem the Sixth Extinction”?

www.greenschoolsireland.org explains that … ecosystems and their plant and animal species “perform important biological services, for example, green plants remove carbon dioxide and release oxygen into the atmosphere, which helps keep the environment healthy and fit for human life”.

Each species, no matter how small, is important, and one species generally relies on another for survival. So when we wipe out one species it has a ripple effect that ultimately destroys ecosystem functioning, and healthy ecosystems provide us with air, water, topsoil to grow our food, even shelter – all the vital things humanity needs to survive.
In a nutshell … the World is in the midst of the “Sixth Extinction” of life on Earth and it is being driven largely by humanity’s activities, and made worse by a climate changing too fast for most species to adapt to. People need to know about this if we are to have any hope of “promoting biodiversity and stemming the Sixth Extinction” – of healing the only planet we can call home.

What is being done?

“Through his concern for our deteriorating global environment, Dr John Anderson founded the Gondwana Alive project in 1998–drawing in top scientists from diverse fields around South Africa. Their first book, ‘Towards Gondwana Alive; promoting biodiversity & stemming the Sixth Extinction’ was published in 1999. It includes dedicated endorsements from Nelson Mandela, Kofi Annan, The Dalai Lama, David Attenborough and other global leaders…”

How is it being done?

Gondwana Alive continues to support publications and events that spread awareness and a call to help stem the “Sixth Extinction”. This includes a series of Earth Alive, Gondwana Alive and Africa Alive publications compiled by Dr John Anderson, in partnership with some of the world’s leading scientists and research organizations.

A pending citation towards consideration of Dr John Anderson for an Associate Professorship at Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, had the following to say…

“All of Anderson’s projects –from palaeobotany to Earth Alive to cultural history–are intimately linked. They are interdisciplinary and multinational. Indeed, they showcase the fundamental connection between all things. Consilience operated in the past and a deep sense of consilience—of reconciliation—is being stressed by Anderson and colleagues as our only option as a species into the future.”

READ MORE about John’s publications below

Why GA supports the invaluable work Dr John Anderson

GA is founded on scientific integrity and we feel that Dr John Anderson’s work continues to educate and promote integrity in spreading our CALL TO ACTION to stem the “Sixth Extinction” and stop annihilation of biodiversity, our home and our life-support system.

How does GA support Dr John Anderson?

GA support Dr John Anderson through assistance with promotion, contributions to publications and fundraising.
Do you have a similar publication that ticks these boxes? We would love to support your cause. Contact us here or see some of our other Publications here.

Gondwana Alive cover & endorsements-1 500w

Chapter 1 is free for your to read. Download here!

This publication is available in hard copy

Order here

Or downloadable PDF

Order here.

‘Molteno Palaeoflora’ (fossil plants)

Molteno

Why the need to learn about Paleoflora?

A fossil is the remains or impression of a prehistoric plant or animal embedded and preserved in rock. By studying the plant fossils (paleoflora) and animals fossils found in rock formations laid down over the ages, scientists gain great insight into the past and what happened to bring us to this point in time.

What specific Paleoflora has been the subject of research? 

The on-going research at the centre of all John Anderson’s work as a paleobotanist and author / editor of publications such as “Towards Gondwana Alive”, “Africa Alive Corridors”, “Earth Alive Strategies” and the “Biodiversity & Extinction”, has been on the fossil flora found in the Molteno Formation.

How has this been carried out?

The fossil flora found in the Molteno rock formation was deposited around the time of origin of the dinosaurs and mammals—in the Karoo Basin of South Africa.

The reconstruction of the vegetation of the Molteno formation at Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens show that at this time the Karoo looked very different to the way it does today.

According to Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molteno_Formation) there was an unusually large biodiversity at class and order level, especially in insects and gymnosperms (which reached their heyday during this period). Other especially common flora, were species of fern, horsetail and cycad.

“Molteno Sphenophytes:  This is one of a series of volumes on our collection of fossil plants from the Molteno Formation of the Karoo Basin, SA (Late Triassic, 230 million years ago). The Molteno represents globally the heyday, in biodiversity, of the gymnosperms (cone-bearing plants).” Dr John Anderson

Much of the region, at the time, fell within an enormous network of inland river deltas. To date, seven primary habitat types (or ecozones) have been identified, each with their own large assemblage of species:

  • Dicroidium riparian forest (types 1 & 2)
  • Dicroidium woodland
  • Sphernobaiera woodland
  • Heidiphyllum thicket
  • Equisetum marsh
  • Fern & Gingkophytopsis meadow

The forest, woodland, marsh and meadow ecozones are very different to the dry, semi-desert succulent Karoo we know today. The clues as to what happened in the Karoo over time are found in the Molteno fossil collection. John Anderson and Heidi Anderson (Holmes) collected fossils from 100 ‘localities’ (mostly new) around the extensive outcrop. Their monograph series, unique in the field, has shown this flora to represent what might well prove to reflect the moment of greatest plant diversity through geological time. Sir Peter Crane, Director of the Kew Gardens at the time, wrote in 2003, for instance,

I am not aware of any set of fossil assemblages that has been collected with such intensity, such uniformity of approach and such care

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT JOHN ANDERSONS RESEARCH & PUBLICATIONS HERE (link to publication list)

Why GA supports the Molteno Series?

The series of volumes being published on the fossil flora of the Molteno Formation lies at the core of John Anderson’s direct knowledge understanding of biodiversity and extinction, and it is from this deep insight that he initiated the Gondwana Alive project in 1998.

How does GA support research?

Through promotion and application of research that helps promote biodiversity & stem extinction, by building capacity for monitoring and research, and contributing through practice to the growing body of socio-ecological knowledge.

FOLLOW THESE LINKS to find out more about the projects we support that contribute directly to the body of knowledge on biodiversity (e.g. OTS), biodiversity & extinction (e.g. Ujubee) and biodiversity restoration (e.g. Grootvadersbosch Working for Ecosystems). Through our practice we hope to contribute more to the growing body of socio-ecological research and to be guided by this research in optimizing our activities and impact.

Earth Alive

Earth alive cards

Supernova ‘Biodiversity & Extinction’ series

Biodiversity& Extinction

The first of our series on Biodiversity and Extinction is available by clicking the PDF links below.

Part 1 – Biodiversity and Extinction

Part 1

Part 2 – Plants

Part 2

Part 3 – Birds

Part 3

Part 4 – Mammals

Part 4

Part 5 – Insects

Part 5

Thanks to our publishing partner, Supernova (click to visit their site) and our sponsor Cranefield College (click here to visit their site),

We have now produced Parts 1 to 5 (of 12) in this series—Introduction, Flowering Plants, Birds, Mammals-

The aim is to go global in both hard & electronic copy.

Read more about Extinction and the Supernova series

‘101 Strategies’ for Stemming the Sixth Extinction

Why the need for 101 Strategies?

To heal our planet humanity need to act and act now. Often for people to act or take a step they need to be able to see the road ahead. There is a need to stimulate thinking around the possible roads we can take to heal our planet.

What is being done in this regard?

To stimulate thinking John Anderson in partnership with the Africa Earth Observatory Network (AEON) came up with 101 Strategies to keep Earth Alive.

AEON is a centre for Earth Systems Science (ESS) and is forging Earth Stewardship into a Science that can sustain the planet and its people. Read more about AEON here (www.aeon.org.za)

How are “101 Strategies” being distributed?

The 101 Strategies to keep Earth Alive were published in MiniMag and distributed to 1000 schools. They also developed an educational game called Imizila (meaning the way through) to stimulate others in thinking around strategies to help heal our planet.

mimimag 600dpi

101 Strategies and Imizila were launched at the International Year of Planet Earth (IYPE), Arusha, Tanzania, (2008), with 10 selected South African students taking on 10 selected Tanzanian students in coming up with the most innovative Earth Alive strategy. It received enthusiastic support from President Kikwete of Tanzani, a showing that this game is not only for children, and is less of a game, and more of a stimulant for great ideas. The 101 Strategies MiniMag booklet and Imizila Game are closely aligned with the Africa Alive Corridor project, which was chosen as one of two legacy projects coming out of the IYPE.

“Our Earth and her inhabitants are in deep trouble in the face of global warming, extinction of biodiversity, geohazards, and a plethora of social ills. We have not yet found the way to manage our globalising society. Imizila, in this context, is about seeking a new path for Africa through the uncertain 21st Century and beyond.”

Read more on http://aeon.org.za/activities/africa-alive-corridors/

Why Gondwana Alive supports 101 Strategies

We need to inspire and motivate humanity to take action to look after biodiversity and heal our planet. 101 Strategies and the Imizila game are designed to do just that.

How does GA support 101 Strategies?

Through promotion and support of innovative projects that inform and demonstrate the road to a healthy, sustainable future for all.

You will shortly be able to download the 101 Strategies MiniMag booklet here.

Do you have a similar project that ticks these boxes? We would love to support your cause. Contact us here or see some of our other Publications here.

Millennium

A presentation of Western Civilisation 1000-2000 AD; the sciences, arts & governance; the 250 most influential builders of our civilisation & the links between them; through the Renaissance, Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment; how did we get from the Middle Ages to here in 1000 years; and whereto from here?!

Mill

Darwin Trilogy

Darwin_aged_31 DarwinCa1859 charles-darwin1

Why the need for focus on Darwin?

Darwin was one of the most influential thinkers of our time and had a profound influence on the life sciences. The Darwin Centenary was in 2009 and with it came a need to acknowledge and celebrate his contribution, not only to science, but to humanity.

What has been the result of Dr John Anderson’s research on Darwin?

John Anderson studied Darwin as part of his life long investigation of the 250 individuals, in the sciences, arts and governance, who have been central to driving Western civilisation from 1000-2000  AD. He wrote the Darwin Trilogy around 2009 to celebrate the Darwin centenary.

How has this knowledge been distributed?

The Darwin Trilogy includes:

  • Nothing by ere authority’ (article on the sciences & religion, published 2008);
  • ‘I am so utterly destitute of an ear’ (play on Darwin & the arts);
  • ‘Synchrodestiny, Coincidence & Consilience’ (historical short story around Darwin, in draft).

According to Wikipedia “Charles Robert Darwin, FRS FRGS FLS FZS (12 February 1809 – 19 April 1882) was an English naturalist and geologist, best known for his contributions to evolutionary theory. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors, and in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.

Darwin published his theory of evolution with compelling evidence in his 1859 book On the Origin of Species, overcoming scientific rejection of earlier concepts of transmutation of species. By the 1870s, the scientific community and much of the general public had accepted evolution as a fact. However, many favoured competing explanations and it was not until the emergence of the modern evolutionary synthesis from the 1930s to the 1950s that a broad consensus developed in which natural selection was the basic mechanism of evolution. In modified form, Darwin’s scientific discovery is the unifying theory of the life sciences, explaining the diversity of life.”

Why Gondwana Alive supports the Darwin Trilogy

Darwin was instrumental in explaining the diversity of life Gondwana Alive strives to protect through our call for stewardship, development of stewardship capacity and support of stewardship practice.

How does GA support the Darwin Trilogy?

Through promotion.

Do you have similar projects that ticks these boxes? We would love to support your cause. Contact us here or see some of the other projects we support.

World of Glimpsibles

The world of Glimpse

A dialogue with Ellen Pallestrant (Arizona, USA). Here is a dialogue between an imaginary world (like Alice & Wonderland or Harry Potter) and the real world as revealed by Science. See Amazon. com for an idea of the book, recently published.

Ellen is part of our ‘Class of 1955’ (final year of junior school).

Amphitheatre Sculptures

Building a microcosm of our world right here at home, through 43 garden sculptures (set in a cosmopolitan garden, with the plants representing the major branches of the flowering-plant tree) and 43 indoor sculptures; from ‘EarthTime’ to ‘Gondwana Alive/Earth Alive/Africa Alive’ to ‘Philosophers Ridge’.

Amphitheatre