West Coast

The semi-arid West Coast of South Africa has a high diversity of unique, rare and endangered vegetation types.

Protection, restoration and sustainable use of this unique vegetation can help develop a sustainable economy to replace the down-scaled mining and fishing industries.

Gondwana Alive supports several projects in biodiversity hotspots on the West Coast and along the Homo Sapien Corridor – a unique heritage corridor running around the coast from Langebaan to Port Elizabeth.

Near !Khwa ttu

Homo Sapien Corridor

In Cape West Coast Biosphere Reserve

BRC Land and Livestock

RIM of Africa Start

Cape West Coast Biosphere Reserve

Conserving unique heritage

The Cape West Coast of South Africa falls within the Cape Floral Region World Heritage Site – recognized for its outstanding universal significance to humanity. Unfortunately, poverty and unemployment levels are also extremely high in this rural area, and its’ unique natural and cultural heritage are under threat from unsustainable development. There is a real need to promote conservation and sustainable development in this region. This is the purpose of the Cape West Coast Biosphere Reserve (www.capebiosphere.co.za).

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Cape West Coast Biosphere Reserve Trails

The Cape West Coast Biosphere Trails offer a wonderful way to contribute to sustainable economic development and conservation, stay healthy, connect with nature, feel a whole lot better, explore and experience the West Coast of South Africa.

 

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!Khwa ttu
!Khwa ttu Trails

Explore the Cape West Coast

The !Khwa ttu Trails offer a wonderful way for families to stay healthy, connect with nature, feel a whole lot better, experience the West Coast of South Africa and enjoy friendly San hospitality and culture.

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RIM of Africa

South Africa’s high mountain areas offer an incredible wilderness experience and a vital source of fresh water – making them imperative to conserve.

 

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BRC Land Livestock Adaptation

Surviving climate change

Climate change projections have indicated that the Namakwa District, in the Northern Cape, will be subject to increasing temperatures and changing rainfall patterns, more specifically droughts, seasonal shifts and storm-related disaster events. The area has already seen a 2 degrees Celsius increase in mean temperatures over the past 50 years, and it is predicted that it will become hotter and drier. Warming, and the associated increase in the number of extremely warm days, is set to impact evaporation rates and water availability. This is a concern as water is already scarce in Namakwa.

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